Making Decisions With Your Head, Heart and Gut!

When faced with making decisions, do you find yourself torn between your head and your heart? And how about your gut feeling, how often does your head and heart wrestle with that? If this is a familiar experience for you when making decisions, then here is something you can use. It’s designed to tap into […] read more...

Written By Kevin Watson

On June 15, 2015

When faced with making decisions, do you find yourself torn between your head and your heart?

And how about your gut feeling, how often does your head and heart wrestle with that?
If this is a familiar experience for you when making decisions, then here is something you can use. It’s designed to tap into the intelligence of your head, heart and gut to seek a more balanced and informed way to reach decisions.
Firstly, take a few moment to recognise each of these parts of you.
The head is your conscious mind, the part of you that makes judgements, analyses logically and computes solutions based on these.
The heart is the part of you that emits emotions, the full passion – love and hate. It can of course appear illogical and irrational to your conscious mind.
Then there’s the gut, the part of you where intuition resides. This is often the loudest part, yet is mostly ignored by both your head and heart!
When faced with a problem or dilemma, it is useful to check in with each of these parts, asking what response each has to the situation you face. Compare and contrast the difference, and similarity, to each response you get.
Of course, you need to be open to what comes back, as it may simply be a feeling, a colour or some abstract response that you (your conscious mind) will not immediately draw meaning from. Oh, be aware that your head will often jump right on in and give you what it thinks the other part is saying!
You can use these parts of you as an ecology check for any solutions you come up with, too. Check in with each one and have them rate your idea on a scale of 1 to 5 – where 1 is totally unsatisfactory and 5 is totally satisfactory.
Then notice how each one rates the idea before seeking any necessary alternatives to overcome any objections.
Making this a regular practice will help keep you in balance and avoid the wrestling when you’re making decisions, particularly the tough ones!

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